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Law Code Tablet of King Hammurabi from Nippur
Image by Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin

Law Code Tablet of King Hammurabi from Nippur

This terracotta tablet is a smaller version of the original law code stela of King Hammurabi to be used in schools and courts. The tablet was found at Nippur (modern Nuffar, Al-Qadisiyah Governorate, Iraq), southern Mesopotamia. Old Babylonian...
Law of Anastasius I Dicorus
Image by Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin

Law of Anastasius I Dicorus

Marble slab inscribed in Greek. This is the law of the Byzantine Emperor Anastasius I Dicorus (reigned 491-518 CE), regulating the passage through Dardanelles customs. Byzantine Period, 6th century CE. From Abydos, Çanakkale, in modern-day...
The Law Code of Gortyn, Crete
Image by Mark Cartwright

The Law Code of Gortyn, Crete

The lawcode from Gortyn, Crete was written in the 5th century BCE and is said to be the largest epigraphic text in ancient Greek (8 m x 1.70 m).
Moses Recieves the Law
Image by Fr Lawrence Lew, O.P.

Moses Recieves the Law

Detail from the west window of Bath Abbey showing Moses receiving the tablets of the Commandments from the hand of God.
Hammurabi's Law Code
Image by James Blake Wiener

Hammurabi's Law Code

A diorite stele with an inscription of Hammurabi's code of laws. Susa, Babylonia, 18th century BCE. Cast of the original now in the Louvre, Paris. (Pushkin Museum, Moscow)
Paul the Apostle
Definition by Rebecca Denova

Paul the Apostle

Paul was a follower of Jesus Christ who famously converted to Christianity on the road to Damascus after persecuting the very followers of the community that he joined. However, as we will see, Paul is better described as one of the founders...
Corpus Juris Civilis
Definition by Mark Cartwright

Corpus Juris Civilis

The Justinian Code or Corpus Juris Civilis (Corpus of Civil Law) was a major reform of Byzantine law created by Emperor Justinian I (r. 527-565 CE) in 528-9 CE. Aiming to clarify and update the old Roman laws, eradicate inconsistencies and...
The Vikings in Iceland
Article by Joshua J. Mark

The Vikings in Iceland

The medieval sources on the discovery and settlement of Iceland frequently refer to the explorers as “Vikings” but, technically, they were not. The term “Viking” applies only to Scandinavian raiders, not to Scandinavians...
Twelve Tables
Definition by Mark Cartwright

Twelve Tables

The Twelve Tables (aka Law of the Twelve Tables) was a set of laws inscribed on 12 bronze tablets created in ancient Rome in 451 and 450 BCE. They were the beginning of a new approach to laws where they would be passed by government and written...
Hammurabi
Definition by Joshua J. Mark

Hammurabi

Hammurabi (also known as Khammurabi  and Ammurapi, reigned 1792-1750 BCE) was the sixth king of the Amorite First Dynasty of Babylon, assumed the throne from his father, Sin-Muballit, and expanded the kingdom to conquer all of ancient...