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The Canterbury Tales
Definition by Joshua J. Mark

The Canterbury Tales

The Canterbury Tales (written c. 1388-1400 CE) is a medieval literary work by the poet Geoffrey Chaucer (l. c. 1343-1400 CE) comprised of 24 tales related to a number of literary genres and touching on subjects ranging from fate to God’s...
Henry I of England
Definition by Mark Cartwright

Henry I of England

Henry I reigned as the king of England from 1100 to 1135 CE. The son of William the Conqueror (r. 1066-1087 CE), Henry succeeded his brother William II of England (r. 1087-1100 CE) after he had died in a hunting accident and left no heir...
Despotate of Epirus
Definition by Michael Goodyear

Despotate of Epirus

The Despotate of Epirus was one of the successor states of the Byzantine Empire when it disintegrated following the Fourth Crusade’s capture of Constantinople in 1204 CE. It was originally the most successful of those successor...
Consul
Definition by Donald L. Wasson

Consul

In 509 BCE with the exit of the last Etruscan king, Tarquin the Elder, the Roman people were presented with a unique opportunity, an opportunity that would eventually have an immense impact on the rest of Europe for centuries to come: the...
Visigoth
Definition by Joshua J. Mark

Visigoth

The Visigoths were the western tribe of the Goths (a Germanic people) who settled west of the Black Sea sometime in the 3rd century CE. According to the scholar Herwig Wolfram, the Roman writer Cassiodorus (c. 485-585...
Sabratha
Definition by Joshua J. Mark

Sabratha

Sabratha was an ancient port city on the coast of North Africa (in modern-day Libya). The site was originally inhabited by the indigenous Berber Zwagha tribe in the 8th century BCE (according to the 11th-century CE historian al-Bakari) who...
Archimedes
Definition by Cristian Violatti

Archimedes

Archimedes (287-212 BCE) was a Greek mathematician and mechanical engineer, a pioneer in both fields, many centuries ahead of his contemporaries. Today he is best known for formulating Archimedes' Principle, also known as the...
The Jericho River: An Interview with David Tollen
Article by Jan van der Crabben

The Jericho River: An Interview with David Tollen

In his first work of fiction, the novel The Jericho River ($12.88 on Amazon/ $9.94 on Bookdepository) David Tollen tells a vivid story by beautifully bringing together most major civilizations in history. In this exclusive interview...
Buddhism in Ancient Japan
Article by Mark Cartwright

Buddhism in Ancient Japan

Buddhism was introduced to ancient Japan via Korea in the 6th century CE with various sects following in subsequent centuries via China. It was readily accepted by both the elite and ordinary populace because it confirmed the political and...
Women in Ancient China
Article by Mark Cartwright

Women in Ancient China

Women in ancient China did not enjoy the status, either social or political, afforded to men. Women were subordinate to first their fathers, then their husbands, and finally, in the case of being left a widow, their sons in a system known...