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Cassander
Definition by Donald L. Wasson

Cassander

Cassander (c. 355-297 BCE, r. 305-297 BCE) was self-proclaimed king of Macedon during the political turmoil following Alexander's death. Born in Greece as the son of Antipater, the regent of Macedon and Greece in the absence of Alexander...
Antipater (Macedonian General)
Definition by Donald L. Wasson

Antipater (Macedonian General)

Antipater (c. 399-319 BCE) was a Macedonian statesman and loyal lieutenant of both Alexander the Great and his father Philip II of Macedon. As a regent in Alexander's absence, Antipater subdued rebellions and mollified uprisings, proving...
Alexander the Great
Definition by Joshua J. Mark

Alexander the Great

Alexander III of Macedon, known as Alexander the Great (l. 20 or 21 July 356 BCE – 10 or 11 June 323 BCE, r. 336-323 BCE), was the son of King Philip II of Macedon (r. 359-336 BCE). He became king upon his father’s death...
Antigonus I
Definition by Donald L. Wasson

Antigonus I

Antigonus I Monophthalmus ("the One-Eyed") (382 -301 BCE) was one of the successor kings to Alexander the Great, controlling Macedonia and Greece. When Alexander the Great died in 323 BCE, a conflict known as the Wars of the...
Lysimachus
Definition by Donald L. Wasson

Lysimachus

Lysimachus (c. 361-281 BCE) was one of Alexander the Great’s trusted bodyguards and a member of his Companion Cavalry.  Although he obtained Macedonian citizenship, his father was a Thessalian named Agathocles. After Alexander’s...
Olympias
Definition by Donald L. Wasson

Olympias

Alexander the Great owed much to the influence of his parents: from his father, Philip II, he learned the art of warfare, but by far the most influential person in his life was his mother, Olympias. From her he inherited not only his love...
Hellenistic Warfare
Definition by Donald L. Wasson

Hellenistic Warfare

When Alexander the Great died in 323 BCE, he left behind an empire devoid of leadership. Without a named successor or heir, the old commanders simply divided the kingdom among themselves. For the next three decades, they fought a lengthy...
Seleucus I Nicator
Definition by Donald L. Wasson

Seleucus I Nicator

Seleucus I Nicator (l. c. 358-281 BCE, r. 305-281 BCE) was one of the generals of Alexander the Great (l. 356-323 BCE) who make up the group of Diadochi ("successors") who divided the vast Macedonian Empire between them after Alexander's...
Roxanne
Definition by Donald L. Wasson

Roxanne

After Alexander the Great’s victory over King Darius III at the Battle of Gaugamela in 331 BC, he had to contend with small rebellions that broke out across his empire. In the summer of 328 BC, one such rebellion occurred in the eastern...
Cassander
Image by The Trustees of the British Museum

Cassander

Alloy coin from Macedon, minted under the rule of Cassander (305-297 BCE).