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Ephesus
Definition by Joshua J. Mark

Ephesus

According legend, Ephesus (also Ephesos) was founded by the tribe of the Amazons, great female warriors. The name of the city is thought to have been derived from "Apasas", the name of a city in the "Kingdom of Arzawa"...
Heraclitus of Ephesus
Definition by Joshua J. Mark

Heraclitus of Ephesus

Heraclitus of Ephesus (l. c. 500 BCE) was one of the early Pre-Socratic philosophers who, like the others, sought to identify the First Cause for the creation of the world. Thales of Miletus (l. c. 585 BCE) claimed this cause was water while...
Temple of Artemis at Ephesus
Definition by Mark Cartwright

Temple of Artemis at Ephesus

The Temple of Artemis at Ephesus located on the western coast of Asia Minor (modern Turkey) was built in the 6th century BCE, and such was its tremendous size, double the dimensions of other Greek temples including the Parthenon, that it...
Artemisia I of Caria
Definition by Joshua J. Mark

Artemisia I of Caria

Artemisia of Caria (also known as Artemisia I) was the queen of the Anatolian region of Caria (south of ancient Lydia, in modern-day Turkey). She is most famous for her role in the naval Battle of Salamis in 480 BCE in which she fought...
Asia Minor
Definition by Joshua J. Mark

Asia Minor

Ancient Asia Minor is a geographic region located in the south-western part of Asia comprising most of what is present-day Turkey. The earliest reference to the region comes from tablets of the Akkadian Dynasty (2334-2083 BCE) where it is...
Library of Celsus
Definition by Mark Cartwright

Library of Celsus

The Library of Celsus in ancient Ephesus, located in western Turkey, was a repository of over 12,000 scrolls and one of the most impressive buildings in the Roman Empire. Constructed in the 2nd century CE, it was named after the city's former...
Pre-Socratic Philosophers
Definition by Joshua J. Mark

Pre-Socratic Philosophers

The Pre-Socratic Philosophers are defined as the Greek thinkers who developed independent and original schools of thought from the time of Thales of Miletus (l. c. 546 BCE) to that of Socrates of Athens (470/469-399 BCE). They are known as...
Heraclitus' Fragments
Article by Joshua J. Mark

Heraclitus' Fragments

Heraclitus of Ephesos (l. c. 500 BCE) was an early Pre-Socratic philospher who claimed that the First Cause of existence was fire and that life itself was characterized by strife and change. Heraclitus did not see this condition as a bad...
Heraclitus: Life Is Flux
Article by Joshua J. Mark

Heraclitus: Life Is Flux

Heraclitus of Ephesus (l. c. 500 BCE) famously claimed that “life is flux” and, although he seems to have thought this observation would be clear to all, people have continued to resist change from his time to the present...
Ignatius of Antioch & His Letter to the Ephesians
Article by John S. Knox

Ignatius of Antioch & His Letter to the Ephesians

For many people, the origins of the Christian church are shrouded in obscurity outside of the biblical narratives concerning Jesus Christ and his Jewish followers. Yet, after the crucifixion of Jesus and the initial missions work across the...