Rubicon: Did you mean...?

Search

The Extent of the Roman Empire
Article by Donald L. Wasson

The Extent of the Roman Empire

Time has seen the rise and fall of a number of great empires - the Babylonian, the Assyrian, the Egyptian, and lastly, the Persian.  Regardless of the size or skill of their army or the capabilities of their leaders, all of these empires...
Roman Citizenship
Article by Donald L. Wasson

Roman Citizenship

Citizenship is and always has been a valued possession of any individual. When one studies the majority of ancient empires one finds that the concept of citizenship, in any form, was non-existent. The people in these societies did not and...
Elephants in Hellenistic History & Art
Article by Branko van Oppen

Elephants in Hellenistic History & Art

Elephants were thought of as fierce and frightful monsters in antiquity, very real though rarely seen until the Hellenistic period. They were deployed on the battlefield to strike terror into the enemy, however, since fear was considered...
Interrelations of Kerma and Pharaonic Egypt
Article by Paul Joseph De Mola

Interrelations of Kerma and Pharaonic Egypt

The vacillating nature of Ancient Egypt’s associations with the Kingdom of Kerma may be described as one of expansion and contraction; a virtual tug-of-war between rival cultures. Structural changes in Egypt’s administration led...
Julius Caesar: The Faults Behind the Myth
Article by Marc Hyden

Julius Caesar: The Faults Behind the Myth

Last March marked the anniversary of Julius Caesar’s assassination over 2,000 years ago, and after two millennia, his legendary achievements still linger in today’s consciousness just as they have for centuries. He was so revered...
Roman Republic at the Beginning of Caesar's Civil War
Image by Stone Chen

Roman Republic at the Beginning of Caesar's Civil War

This map depicts the territories under Julius Caesar and Roman Senate in the wake of the outbreak of Caesar's Civil War in 49 BCE in the Roman Republic. Caesar crossed the Rubicon and marched on Rome while Pompey, supported by the Senate...