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Suppliants by Euripides
Definition by Donald L. Wasson

Suppliants by Euripides

The Suppliants (also given as Suppliant Women) is a Greek tragedy written by Euripides, not to be confused with Aeschylus' tragedy of the same title. Its exact date of production is not known, possibly around 424 to 420...
Ancient Greek Tragedy
Definition by Mark Cartwright

Ancient Greek Tragedy

Greek tragedy was a popular and influential form of drama performed in theatres across ancient Greece from the late 6th century BCE. The most famous playwrights of the genre were Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides and many of their works...
Euripides
Definition by Mark Cartwright

Euripides

Euripides (c. 484-407 BCE) was one of the greatest authors of Greek tragedy. In 5th century BCE Athens his classic works such as Medeia cemented his reputation for clever dialogues, fine choral lyrics and a gritty realism in both his text...
Seven Against Thebes
Definition by Donald L. Wasson

Seven Against Thebes

Seven Against Thebes is the third part of a trilogy written by one of the greatest of the Greek tragedians, Aeschylus in 467 BCE, winning first prize in competition at Dionysia. Unfortunately, only fragments of the first two plays, Laius...
Seven Against Thebes
Image by Carole Raddato

Seven Against Thebes

High terracotta Etruscan relief depicting scenes from the myth of the Seven Against Thebes. It decorated the back of the temple of the sanctuary at Pyrgi, 470-460 BCE, National Etruscan Museum of Villa Giulia, Rome.
Eteocles & Polynices
Image by Alfred J. Church

Eteocles & Polynices

Eteocles and Polynices being carried away, dead, after the Battle of Thebes. Stories from the Greek Tragedians by the Rev. Alfred J. Church, M.A. (1829-1912 CE) Project Gutenberg eText 14994
The Greek Strategy at the Battle of Salamis 480 BCE
Article by Antonis Mistriotis

The Greek Strategy at the Battle of Salamis 480 BCE

The history of the second Persian war as presented in most of the modern literature is solely based on Herodotus’ Histories. However, Herodotus’ narration seems to contain several unrealistic elements which raise doubts about...
Aeschylus
Definition by Mark Cartwright

Aeschylus

Aeschylus (c. 525 - c. 456 BCE) was one of the great writers of Greek Tragedy in 5th century BCE Classical Athens. Known as 'the father of tragedy', the playwright wrote up to 90 plays, winning with half of them at the great Athenian...
Attila the Hun
Definition by Joshua J. Mark

Attila the Hun

Attila the Hun (r. 434-453 CE) was the leader of the ancient nomadic people known as the Huns and ruler of the Hunnic Empire, which he established. His name means "Little Father" and, according to some historians, may not have...
Ancient Greek Literature
Definition by Donald L. Wasson

Ancient Greek Literature

Greek literature has influenced not only its Roman neighbors to the west but also countless generations across the European continent. Greek writers are responsible for the introduction of such genres as poetry, tragedy, comedy, and western...