Imdugud Copper Frieze from the Ninhursag Temple (Illustration

Illustration

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
by
published on 26 July 2014
Imdugud Copper Frieze from the Ninhursag Temple

This frieze was excavated at the base of the temple of the goddess Ninhursag at Tell Al-Ubaid. The lion-headed eagle monster, or Imdugud, grasps a pair of deer. Imdugud represents the Sumerian god Ningirsu, and it is unknown why it was placed at the temple of Ninhursag. The frieze was probably placed above one of the main doorways of the temple. It was found in a very poor condition and required extensive conservation. It represents an exceptional example of large-scale Sumerian metalwork. Early dynastic III, circa 2500 BCE, from Tell Al-Ubaid, southern Mesopotamia, Iraq. (The British Museum).


About the Author

Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin
Associate Professor of Neurology and lover of the Cradle of Civilization, Mesopotamia. I'm very interested in Mesopotamian history and always try to take photos of archaeological sites and artifacts in museums, both in Iraq and around the world.

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Cite This Work

APA Style

Amin, O. S. M. (2014, July 26). Imdugud Copper Frieze from the Ninhursag Temple. Ancient History Encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://www.ancient.eu/image/2869/

Chicago Style

Amin, Osama S. M. "Imdugud Copper Frieze from the Ninhursag Temple." Ancient History Encyclopedia. Last modified July 26, 2014. https://www.ancient.eu/image/2869/.

MLA Style

Amin, Osama S. M. "Imdugud Copper Frieze from the Ninhursag Temple." Ancient History Encyclopedia. Ancient History Encyclopedia, 26 Jul 2014. Web. 17 Jul 2019.

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